Date Archives August 10, 2018

Untrusted Domain

Just yesterday I got a call from a colleague about his inability to connect to a SQL Server 2016 instance from the application interface. The error being returned was “Test failed. Login failed. The login is from an untrusted domain and cannot be used with Windows Authentication”

In my past experience this error would happen under one of the following scenarios:

  1. The client machine is not joined to the same Active Directory Domain as the database server

  2. The user is trying to use an SQL Login for an instance configured for Windows Auth ONLY

  3. There is a mismatch between the the supported NTLM version on the client and the database computers. (See Server Manager > Tools Local Security Policy > Security Options > Network Security: LAN Manager Authentication Level)

In this particular case everything seemed OK. The problem simply went away when the password for the account being used to connect was reset. Any ideas on the cause are welcome.

REF:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/security-policy-settings/network-security-lan-manager-authentication-level

 

Doing Nothing

In the fast-paced world of the 21st century in which we find ourselves, there is the temptation to believe that one is lagging behind if one is not consistently doing something, going somewhere, expending some energy in some way. This ideology has consumed us so much that we fail to take stock at intervals to examine whether our never-ending series of activities are actually yielding the desired results. It is almost like the case of a child in a funny video who began running in the opposite direction with all his might as soon as the baton was passed to him in a relay race. He spent a lot of energy losing the race.

“The Sabbath was made for man…”. The concept of the Sabbath beyond being conceived as an item in the Law of Moses should be seen as an idea of God, teaching us to spend certain periods in the cycles of our lives simply doing NOTHING. Doing nothing for a short period can prepare us for a much more meaningful course of action the next time we do step out and take action. This week, find time to do simply NOTHING. It will be worth the effort.